discussion

Identifying knowledge gaps through illustrations


Carl Novina, Into PracticeDr. Carl Novina, Associate Professor of Medicine, and his co-instructor Shannon Turley, amended the traditional graduate seminar Critical Reading for Immunology  to teach students comprehension and presentation skills essential to a career in biomedical science. To introduce a topic, students read research papers and present a focused background on the field the paper sought to advance. Then, rather than discussing the paper linearly, students select a key figure that best highlighted the main point. Throughout the semester,students revisit central points of papers and diagram them on the white board—“an effective means to help students better process information and have greater insights into central concepts from the presentations and papers.”

Research: Research Trends in Science Education from 2008 to 2012: A systematic content analysis of publications in selected journals

Argumentation is a discourse through which knowledge claims are individually and collaboratively constructed and evaluated in the light of empirical or theoretical evidence. In science education, it is considered to be a core practice that can empower students develop their reasoning skills either... Read more about Research: Research Trends in Science Education from 2008 to 2012: A systematic content analysis of publications in selected journals

Questioning, Listening & Responding

The Harvard Business School’s Christensen Center for Teaching and Learning offers guidelines for questioning, listening, and responding for faculty leading class discussion.

Cultivating the skill and the orientation to listen


Joshua Margolis, Into PracticeJoshua Margolis, James Dinan and Elizabeth Miller Professor of Business Administration, demands of himself intensive listening while teaching, and asks the same from students: “When I listen really carefully it allows me to push students hard and help them see what they have within themselves.” While students speak, he makes direct eye contact and maintains it even when he moves in the classroom so they’re addressing the rest of the class, not just him. Margolis asks a series of follow-up questions and then summarizes after every three to five interactions.

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